The social economy of the Tlingit Indians.

by Oberg, Kalervo

Publisher: University of Chicago in Chicago

Written in English
Published: Pages: 170 Downloads: 832
Share This

Subjects:

  • Tlingit Indians -- Economic conditions
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination3, 170 .
Number of Pages170
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15134613M

The Tlingit Indians: results of a trip to the Northwest Coast of America and the Bering ated by Erna Gunther. Seattle, University of Washington Press for the American Ethnological Society, 15, p. illus. Oberg, Kalervo. The social economy of the Tlingit Indians. 3, l. illus. Born to Finnish parents in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Oberg is perhaps best known for applying the term culture shock to all people who travel abroad into new cultures and for his doctoral dissertation, The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians of Alaska. His family moved to Sointula, British Columbia, when Oberg was very young, but the. The Internet Archive offers o, freely downloadable books and texts. There is also a collection of million modern eBooks that may be borrowed by anyone with a free account. Borrow a Book Books on Internet Archive are offered in many formats, including DAISY. Stratification and social structure. The Northwest Coast was the outstanding exception to the anthropological truism that hunting and gathering cultures—or, in this case, fishing and gathering cultures—are characterized by simple technologies, sparse possessions, and small egalitarian bands. In this region food was plentiful; less work was required to meet the subsistence needs of the.

The Wind Won't Know Me: A History of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, WYSIWYG pricing--no added shipping charge for standard shipping within USA. A Niblack "The Coast Indians of Southern Alaska and Northern British Columbia" Annual Report for the Smithsonian Institution. Oberg K Oberg The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians PhD dissertation, University of Chicago Olson R Olson "Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska" 26 Anthropological Records Berkeley. Book Description: Sharing Our Knowledgebrings together Native elders, tradition bearers, educators, cultural activists, anthropologists, linguists, historians, and museum professionals to explore the culture, history, and language of the Tlingit people of southeast Alaska and their coastal interdisciplinary, collaborative essays present Tlingit culture, as well as the culture. Tlingit Indians Rosita Worl Native Corporations Tlingit Belong to the land. Their rich environment and their social and gerly joined the market economy with their new corporations. Under ANCSA, the Tlingit and Haida Indians reclaimed ownership of ,

Indian Economic & Social History Review focuses on the history, economy and society of India and South Asia, and includes comparative studies of world development. RG Journal Impact: *. The author's objective in this ethnography was to do a ' study of the structure and functioning of the complex social life, ' (p. V-A). The range of topics covered is broad, including political organization, clan legends and property, social classes, potlatches, feuds and warfare, religion, and historical narratives of several of the clans. The book is primarily a 'memory' ethnography of. Social structure is the way people view their roles in society and their relationships with others. It includes such concepts as "family", "status", and division of labor between males and females. In Tlingit culture, the social structure in its entirety was most completely operative in the winter village. Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Tlingit & Haida) is a tribal government representing o Tlingit and Haida Indians worldwide. We are a sovereign entity and have a government to government relationship with the United States.

The social economy of the Tlingit Indians. by Oberg, Kalervo Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The social economy of the Tlingit Indians. [Kalervo Oberg] -- Doctoral thesis of the author completed in resulting from studies of the Tlingit at Klukwan, their environment, property rights, social organization, etc.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians Paperback – May 1, by Kalervo Oberg (Author) › Visit Amazon's Kalervo Oberg Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

See search results for this author. Are you an author. Learn about Author Central Cited by:   The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians by University of Washington Press. Paperback $ Ship This Item — Temporarily Out of Stock Online.

Buy Online, Pick up in Store is currently unavailable, but this item may be available for in-store purchase. Temporarily Out of Stock Online Publish your book with B&: University of Washington Press. THE SOCIAL ECONOMY OF THE TLINGIT INDIANS [Oberg, Kalervo] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

THE SOCIAL ECONOMY OF THE TLINGIT INDIANSAuthor: Kalervo Oberg. The social economy of the Tlingit Indians / Author: Foreword by Wilson Duff. --Publication info: Seattle: University of Washington Press, [].

The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians. KALERVO OBERG. Foreword by Wilson Duff. Seattle & London: University of Wash- ington Press, xvi + 14 pp., appendix, index.

$ (cloth). Reviewed by ROSITA WORL Ha r va rd University Mr. William Paul, a Tlingit lawyer, made several criticisms of Oberg’s book whichAuthor: Rosita Worl. PDF – Book Reviews, BC Stud Autumn The Coast Indians of Southern Alaska and Northern British Columbia U.S.

National MuseumNotes. Reprinted by Johnson Reprint Corp.; New York; Oberg, Kalervo, The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians University of Washington Press; Seattle; Kalervo Oberg is the author of The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians ( avg rating, 2 ratings, 1 review, published ), The Terena and the Caduv 5/5.

Author by: George Emmons Languange: en Publisher by: University of Washington Press Format Available: PDF, ePub, Mobi Total Read: 34 Total Download: File Size: 50,7 Mb Description: This The social economy of the Tlingit Indians. book study of the Tlingit Indians of southern Alaska and the coast of British Columbia is an edited version of manuscripts by the ethnographer G.

Emmons compiled in the s and s. The Social economy of the Tlingit Indians, a part of a dissertation. by Kalervo Oberg. Kalervo Oberg Published by Chicago: University of Chicago libraries (). Ethnographer Kalervo Oberg, in The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians, reports: “The clan has a name denoting its place of origin, a story of its genesis, and a history of its migration.” Tlingit oral tradition speaks of a gradual migration northward from the mouths of the Nass and the Stikine rivers.

Tlingit, northernmost of the Northwest Coast Indians of North America, living on the islands and coastal lands of southern Alaska from Yakutat Bay to Cape Fox.

They spoke the Tlingit language, which is related to Athabaskan. According to their traditions, some of their ancestors came from the south and others migrated to the coast from the Canadian interior. In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F.

Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians. Place signifies not only a specific geographical location but also reveals the ways in which individuals and social groups define notion of place consists of three dimensions - space.

Ethnographer Kalervo Oberg, in The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians, reports: “The clan has a name denoting its place of origin, a story of its genesis, and a history of its migration.” Tlingit oral tradition speaks of a gradual migration northward from the mouths of the Nass and the Stikine rivers.

In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F. Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians. Place signifies not only a specific geographical location but also reveals the ways in which individuals and social groups define themselves.

The Tlingit economy at time of contact was a subsistence economy supported by intense trade. The cash economy and the American systems of ownership have altered the lifestyle of Tlingit people dramatically; however, many Tlingits have adapted successfully.

The social economy of the Tlingit Indians. Oberg, Kalervo, Seattle, University of Washington Press [] and naming. Bridging past and future, this source book fills an important niche in the literature and is designed especially to be accessible to all students of Tlingit culture.

To the Chukchi Peninsula and to the Tlingit. Sociopolitical organization - Tlingit North America. Social Organization. The Tlingit were stratified into three social classes: (1) high-class anyaddi, (2) commoners, or kanackideh, and (3) low-class nitckakaku.

Individuals and groups were also ranked within the clan and between clans, depending upon their wealth, titles, and achievements. The Tlingit (/ ˈ k l ɪ ŋ k ɪ t / or / ˈ t l ɪ ŋ ɡ ɪ t /; also spelled Tlinkit; Russian: Тлинкиты) are indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America.

Their language is the Tlingit language (natively Lingít, pronounced [ɬɪnkɪ́t]), in which the name means "People of the Tides". The Russian name Koloshi (Колоши, from a Sugpiaq-Alutiiq term kulut Canada (British Columbia, Yukon): 1, Most read articles by the same author(s) Journal Assistant, Contributors, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly: No Okanagan Futures: Winter /11 Journal Assistant, Introduction, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly: No Provincial Parks: Summer Journal Assistant, Bibliography, BC Studies: The British Columbian Quarterly: No Spring   Ethnographer Kalervo Oberg, in The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians, reports: “The clan has a name denoting its place of origin, a story of its genesis, and a history of its migration.”.

In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F. Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians. Place signifies not only a specific geographical location but also reveals the ways in which individuals and social groups define : Thomas F.

Thornton. In Being and Place among the Tlingit, anthropologist Thomas F. Thornton examines the concept of place in the language, social structure, economy, and ritual of southeast Alaska's Tlingit Indians.

Place signifies not only a specific geographical location but also reveals the ways in which individuals and social groups define themselves/5. The social economy of the Tlingit Indians (American Ethnological Society.

Good. This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings book has hardback covers. In good all round condition. The Social economy of the Tlingit Indians. Oberg, Kalervo.

Published by University of Washington, Seattle. The Tlingit's culture has been molded by the conditions of the Alaskan area. The coast of Alaska is covered with mountains. The climate is temperate and humid. The forests are populated with animal life and seas are bountiful as well.

The Tlingit Indians survived by fishing, hunting, and gathering. The Tlingit Indians lived in three groups.

The Social Organization of the Tlingit and Its Integration into Daily Life Abstract: This academic paper was written for Seminar in Social Science Research, SOSC In this paper, I use a case study of the Tlingit people to highlight the integration of social organization into other aspects of their society.

K Oberg The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians PhD dissertation, University of Chicago Olson R Olson "Social Structure and Social Life of the Tlingit in Alaska" 26. The coastal Tlingit people live on the beaches and islands in the southeastern Alaska Panhandle, tucked between the tidewater and the rugged coastal mountains.

Heavy rainfall creates a luxurious rainforest environment and a temperate climate more like Seattle than Anchorage. The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kawkiutl Indians.

from The Report of the U. S. National Museum. Government Printing Office. p. 2) Boas and Hunt, pp. ff. 3) Oberg K. The Social Economy of the Tlingit Indians. University of Washington Press. 4) .The economy of the region was based on the annual abundant runs of salmon and the resources of the largely evergreen forests.

Although in the north of the region, the Tlingit enjoyed a relatively temperate climate with some winter snows, but with most months largely marked by clouds and rain.The Tlingit people, whose name means "People of the Tides", have a vast history; many speculate its origins dating as early as 11, years ago.

Two major theories exist as to where the Tlingit people originate from, the largest being a coastal migration across the Bering Strait land mass from north Asia.

Others, however, believe that the.